Journey Mercies . . . Life’s Lessons

Journey Mercies . . .  Life’s Lessons

When do “life lessons” begin and when do they end?  From the time we are born our days are filled with rules and regulations.  Do’s and don’ts that are supposed to make our lives easier, richer, fuller, better.  Don’t touch this, don’t do that.  Don’t hit, don’t say bad words, don’t be mean to your sister, always say your prayers, wash your hands before dinner, say yes ma’am and no sir, please and thank-you.  Don’t yell, keep your room clean and don’t say “hate”.  Just writing this takes me back and makes me wonder  . . . did I respond well to the life lessons I learned as a child?

In Robert Fulghum’s book, “All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten” he states “All I really need to know about how to live and what to do I learned in kindergarten.  Wisdom was not at the top of the graduate school mountain, but there in the sand pile at school.”

You can see a list of Fulgham’s lessons from kindergarten here.

My paternal grandparents were well-to-do Orange County business owners, who entertained regularly. Since I was with them every Sunday, I remember my grandfather, who I loved dearly, helping me with my life’s lessons.  He would say things like “Be kind, speak no ill against anyone, love you parents, be a good girl.”  He also spent time teaching me the proper way to sit at dinner  – no elbows on the table, left hand in my lap, right hand holding my fork.  He taught me to say “Would you please pass the gravy?” because you would never reach across the table for anything that was not right in front of you.  He taught me how to respond to an adult as I was being introduced.  I would put out my hand and say “very nice to meet you.” And if they were leaving I would say “Very nice to have met you.” I was all of 7 or 8 years old.  Those and a myriad of others were life lessons that I remember vividly. Reflecting on these has led me to ask,

What life lessons have I imparted to my children?

Well, it would be verbatim from the opening paragraph of this blog.  It’s what we do as parents to help our kids along.  We share our life lessons, with the hope that sooner or later they will “get it”.

I realize now that the “get it” factor doesn’t always resonate and sometimes our life’s lessons are learned the hard way.

What I saw as my children grew was that in learning what life was all about, they created their own set of standards, ideals and boundaries. Growing up means that all of those preset ideals will change. And so will the person who created them.  As Kelly Cutrone, author of If You Have to Cry, Go Outside: And Other Things Your Mother Never Told You, says “In breaking away from the familiar and the expected, you’ll be forced and privileged to face great challenges, learn harder lessons, and really get to know yourself.”  For me, that happened at 50!  The school of hard knocks was alive and well.

What I know now is the lessons we teach our children are only as good as the examples we demonstrate.  How we live our lives and how we show them that honesty, integrity, and character will help them achieve a life of goodness.  With that in mind, I know that I failed in many ways raising my kids.  I know that I put work before their needs at home.

I was a full time employee and a part time mom.

God has been good to me these past 16 years.  After making it through my divorce and some tough life lessons of my own, I realized again that honesty, integrity and character are qualities that give you perspective and the ability to rise above any adversity or failure. I made it part of my restoration to manifest these qualities in my life.  That decision was purposeful. It empowered me to become a strong “mom” figure with my adult children and a better woman.

Do I regret some of those perfectly BAD decisions? Of course I do.  But I also celebrate the way they changed my life.  The way they gave me a deeper sense of who I really am and who I really want to become.  The life lessons I have learned and the life that I live right now . . . I would not change.  I have hope, power, perseverance and love beyond measure.

One of the most incredible revelations for me now is that the wisdom of my years and the life lessons of the past have given me the opportunity to walk along side my children and support them as they come to me for advice or just to talk over how their doing and feeling.

We can never go back . . . but we can change past behaviors, relationships, and decisions.  We can and should mirror our own life’s lessons in the most positive way.  We can be kind, respectful, and be a person of integrity.  We can show compassion, justice, and love. And we can reserve the word “hate” for liver and onions and limburger cheese.

What life lessons did I learn in kindergarten, that are profoundly part of my life right now?

“Say you’re sorry when you hurt someone” and “Clean up your own mess!”

 

•  What life lessons have stuck with you since kindergarten?


Patricia

About Patricia

I’m a native Californian, born and raised in Long Beach. I raised 4 great kids and now have 9 grandchildren. I’m experiencing the greatest chapter of my life right now. I’m blessed beyond words, and so grateful for each day. I’ve been with the O’Connor Family for the past 19 years and have counted it one of my deepest joys and greatest accomplishments. Never did I realize that a passion could become a profession. I have come to believe that serving others, in whatever capacity, gives me a sense of purpose. It has also given me the opportunity to meet incredible healthcare professionals as well as myriads of selfless volunteers. And out of those relationships have come deep, meaningful friendships. We all have an opportunity to do good work. My goal is to create trusting relationships. My desire is to know that what I have done matters. I sum this up with a quote by Norm Henderson . . . “I want to plant trees under whose shade I may not sit”.
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  • I love it! We have so much in common, Patricia. My mother’s favorite wisdom, which she didn’t live by, was “pretty is as pretty does”. Can’t say that was terribly insightful…what IS “pretty doing”? I’ve learned, as I’ve aged (and nearing 60!), that what you wrote is a more powerfully instructive insight: “honesty, integrity and character are qualities that give you
    perspective and the ability to rise above any adversity or failure.”

    I honestly believe I’ve done my best over the years to teach my sons this very lesson – you just said it so succinctly – I’m going to print that out, and hang it on my office wall! Really nice post, Patricia. Oh, who am I kidding. Really GREAT post, Patricia. Thank you.

    • patricia kolstad

      Dear Kim
      Thank you for your kind words. Isn’t it wonderful when we can relate to something or someone simply by sharing a thought or a few letters on a page. We never know who will find it and be touched or angered by if for that matter. The thing is, it makes us think. It makes us react, I may even change the way we feel and give us new insights or perspectives. It may challenge us to be even more than we thought we could be. I have had many friends in these past 20 years that have encouraged me, challenged me and made me accountable for things I never, ever thought I could do. Simply said, we don’t give ourselves enough credit, because in the scheme of things, we are all capable of being great. Life lessons just help us get there and give id a more stable foundation. I’d love to hear from you again, and share our thoughts on pages. I would have never guessed I would be a “blogger”, . . . who would have known?
      Thank you!

      Pat

  • Anne

    Pat,
    Loved reading this. In my family, looks were never discussed. It was very important, however to be smart and tenacious. The older ones were either valedictorians or salutatorians or star of the basketball team.. a lot to live up to. A joke was never at another’s expense. It needed to be truly funny. The best were puns, an often complicated play on words. Exhibiting too much pride would be certainly followed by a “great fall”. If I really got into big trouble at about 5 or 6 or 7: “Be sure your sin will find you out” or “Mama would turn over in her grave if she could see you now.” I laughed loud and long at everything funny or interesting. “If you laugh too hard, you will cry just as hard before bed.” Good clean competition at board games was constant and kept track of, always trying to beat our personal best, but never ever cheating or taking advantage, because “the joy of winning would become worthless”. Reading was big. There were lots of books. Music and singing together was highly rated, harmonizing and singing solos or in groups in church and on the radio. Never wasting anything, making the most of the garden, picking wild berries in season, tapping the maple trees to make syrup and canning and preserving every possible thing. Giving to others first was huge. Though we had nothing to speak of, the bum who lived at the tracks got the first plate of food at Thanksgiving before we could eat. The table was always shared if someone had a need. The canned goods were readily shared with others. We had to raise each other after I turned 5, so probably made a lot of mistakes, but there was a lot of love. So many things, but can’t go on and on.
    Big hugs and thanks
    Anne

    • patricia kolstad

      Anne
      I know you come from “good stock”. You life reflects that. I enjoyed reading about your history and I could just picture you all sitting around a large table and playing games or singing songs. What captivating stories for your grandkids to hear. Something they can take along with them as they make their way through life. You have a huge heart and are a gift to me and so many others. Thank you for sharing this sweet message of love, kindness, gratitude and grace.

      Pat

  • Kori Marie Kolstad

    Mom,
    We know a little something about Life Lessons, don’t we? I love your blog, I do. It’s amazing isn’t it? This journey that we are on. I love where we are right now, and I am excited about where we are going. “Train up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not depart from it.” Proverbs 3:5-6. I am living this verse. I am so grateful for you and for all you taught me growing up. Because today I am a beautiful woman and no matter what difficulties, you taught me how to be that very thing. I love you Mom. I love our relationship that the Lord has restored and made stronger and deeper. I respect you and the Mother, Grammy, and Woman that you are. I look up to you and you inspire me to do better everyday.
    Love your daughter,
    Kori Marie

    • patricia kolstad

      My Sweet Daughter
      Yes, you are living your life lesson. And I’m so proud of where you are in your life right now. We Kolstad women never take the easy way. Hard might not be the best, but it sure has made us all stronger. Thank you for your sweet thoughts and your profound journey. Someday you will tell your grandchildren that living a life of honesty, integrity and character will bring them more joy that taking the hard road. But then you’ll have to let them make their own choices and pray that they don’t make the mistakes of the past. I love you with the depths of my being and I’m grateful for your life!
      Momma

  • MollyKeating

    One of the most important things I learned in my first few years of school was that I needed to work for my money (believe it or not). My mom would reward my brother & I with pennies when we did something well, something helpful, and completed our chores. I had a very real sense of what I had to do in order to earn money and I see that carrying over today into my life with my work ethic and drive. – This isn’t exactly the lesson I was thinking I would’ve learned when I initially read your post but as I reflected on your question and my own experience that was one of the big highlights.
    I love your insight, the story of your growth, and the power of the lessons you’ve learned. Thank you so much for sharing!

    • Molly
      I have seen you grown into a very mature, intelligent woman, who has such depth of soul. I have been witness to your strengths, your joys and your challenges. I have see you move toward them and not away. I know that the life lessons you learned from your parents and brought you to the place where you dwell today. You are compassionate, loving, and wise. You ponder your life with the maturity of someone much older.

      I thank you for the person you are and for the joy I have seeing you move through you life. What an adventure!

      Lovingly
      AP

  • Jeff Turner

    Life lessons…. where to start. Before I talk about a life lesson, I think I will talk about the life lesson of life lessons. That is, the frustration that comes from having to learn them over and over. I am sure I am not the only one for whom repetition is required to actually, finally learn something.

    In the Christian tradition we are told to “present yourself as a living sacrifice”. That image is a tough one to because “living” and “Sacrifice” in their extreme context, are mutually exclusive. Richard Foster once said, “The problem with living sacrifices, is that they take a lifetime to offer. And the other problem is that a living sacrifice is always trying to crawl off of the alter.” Now those are pictures I can identify with.

    As I “mature” (live longer and get older) the patterns become more apparent if I take the time to reflect and observe myself. Even living longer and getting older holds my “maturity” suspect. Still, I begin to be able to predict and even understand some of the motives I operate under, both good and bad. In fact just coming to grips with the fact that I am, in my present state, a mixture of darkness and light is helpful. As frustrating as it is, it is one great life lesson just to be self aware. That is, aware of my *strengths and my weaknesses. *Strengths? The wiser I become, the less I try to fool myself about my so called strengths.

    So, what is my one life lesson? Getting over myself. Others are so much more interesting and worth my attention.

    Thanks for this Pat,

    Jeff

    • Thank you Jeff, for sharing from your heart. We are given that power to make that choice. It’s easier to “crawl off” than to commit and “give up” or surrender. You have been there with me as my life lessons have hit me right between the eyes. Your picture of “darkness and light” have a profound impact on me. I feel the same way that you do when it comes to being aware of where my weaknesses lie. It’s easy to say that we have learned but it takes courage and strength to move forward.

      As always, I’m so thankful for your friendship and your wisdom.Pat

  • Carrie Bayer

    Pat, thank you for the reminder that some of the best lessons were learned long ago. But, I have learned the most in the last few years & they are the most difficult lessons in my whole time on Earth. What I believed was true, wasn’t. What had faith in, was fake. Some that I gave my trust, betrayed it. Those that pointed me in the right direction, led me astray. I have picked myself up & dusted myself off more times in recent years than I can count but thru it all I’ve learned to grow a thicker skin, let go & move on, look past the obvious, second guess when your intuition tells you to & ask alot of clarifying questions. I’m grateful that the lessons have stuck with me I look forward to a lifetime of learning new ones. Carrie

    • Carrie:
      You have moved into another realm of learning. And what an opportunity for you to become the advocate for those who will or are now experienceing maybe something very similar to what you have been through. I have seen you make wiser choices and I applaud your courage to stand strong and be the woman you were meant to be and live the life that you deserve. It’s not wrong to question people, ideals, motives or lifestyles when it could affect your life. As a mentor of mine says . . “trust yet verify”. Doesn’t take long, and can save you a lot of heartache in the process. Thank you for sharing your story.
      Pat

  • Lori

    MP, Boy, life lessons….I’ve learned many. I have reached the age where you want to warn your younger family members not to make the same mistakes that you have.I know it will fall on deaf ears. We all must make our own mistakes to learn. I love you depicting your time with your grandfather. I adored my grandfather and lost him way too early at the age of twelve. He used to take me fishing, which I loved. I spent many a summer with my grandparents. They used to teach me to sit up straight and how to set the table. It made my Grandma crazy that I ate with the “wrong” hand since I am left handed. I have noticed kids today seem to be learning different life lessons than we did. There seems to be a loss of respect for your elders. We have lost that time of innocence. Thank you for yet another wonderful post! Love you! Lori

    • Lori
      It’s true, and I see it all the time. You have pointed out something that I think about, how kids take for granted what they have and may not appreciate how they got it. I know it’s something that my kids struggle with. Just because one has it, doesn’t mean you need to have it. Seems like there is no “waiting” period for anyone. If it makes you happy, do it. As Chuck so aptly put it in his email to us, happiness starts within, not with material things. Life’s Lessons . . . I appreciate them more now, than ever before. It’s definitely reflective.

  • Mom,
    Once again you’ve hit the ball out of the park. I know that you regret the time you lost when we were kids, but you have helped us all to be the children, sibling, parents, spouses, and employees that we are today. We are a very strong lot, and though we’ve all made our own amount of disastrous choices, we have managed to find our footing and stand strong again. Thank you for hanging in there and being an example to your children and grandchildren. Your tenacity and integrity in the past 16 years has healed so much of our heartache from the past. My kindergarten life lesson, “If you can’t say something nice, don’t say anything at all.” Do I struggle with it? Definitely! Do I strive to live it? Absolutely.
    Love you Mom!
    Well done!
    Kari

    • My sweet daughter,
      You are so right . . . we all have continued to move forward and strengthen our foundations. I don’t think that there is anything we can’t do together, or separate for that matter. I realize that it is never to late to begin again, make better choices, an know deep inside that I, we, are worthy. I see wonderful changes in you all the time.
      I love you dearly,
      Momma

  • Neil O’Connor

    Hi Pat –
    I love the depth of your post, they are so inspiring to me!
    I cannot remember kindergarten fro the life of me. My life lessons keep teaching me new things about how to live my life. My newest favorite quote is, ‘Your response is determine your experience.” I love that because it makes me reflect on the way I can choose to live my life. So many times have I let my self respond poorly and it makes my experience less than desirable. Life is about stopping, pausing and giving your self time to be aware of how we are REALLY doing.

    Namaste!

    • patricia kolstad

      Hi Neil:
      You and I have talked about Life Lessons for 19 years and I must admit, that you have taught me several. It takes friends who are willing to share their heart and soul and get down to the “tough stuff”. I can remember internalizing every conversation we ever had. When I got to the point that it’s “just a conversation” it was easier for me to accept all of the good. I love your new mantra . .”Your response will determine your experience.” It’s a good one, and I’m at a time in my life where I let
      those silly little things that bring us to the brink, roll off. Our time here is short and I know that I am a forever learner. Thanks for your comments, and for your ability to direct and challenge. I appreciate you.
      Pat

  • Greg Forster

    Pat,

    This was absolutely beautifully written. You have notable courage for being so honest about your life journey amid its struggles.

    As you stated, we teach our kids (and ourselves) lessons that are important. The depth of field comes when we have to pull back after the lesson has been given, and wait to see how much of it has been absorbed, accepted, internalized and made part of our behaviors. Sometimes the lessons are rejected “dude…SHUT UP…I’m gonna do what I want. This is what my friends do!” But sometimes a stronger satisfaction comes back to us when they quietly return, sometimes years later, and say “I was a jerk for acting that way, a real jerk…and I don’t want to be a jerk this way again”. Great, I think in my head, now you can go off and work on the other 99 jerk lessons I told you about that are floating around in your “head cheese”. I remind myself, however, of those times that I, in my pre-adult, pre-matured testosterone emerging youth of those life chapters that I bury in my head, and, thanks be to God, manage to keep from surfacing thru remembrances or triggers as much as possible,

    How much energy could have been used elsewhere if I didn’t have to waste it on burying from memory my own “jerkishness”?

    I enjoyed reading about the way in which you learned proper manners. Manners, good or poor, show us to the world for what we really care about….and if we really even care about how others perceive us. My wife and I have always been on the same page with this as being a priority in raising our 2 boys. We would silently smile when they would come to us after being “grossed out” by someone’s behavior or language. They saw for themselves how acting poorly cheapens one’s opinion of others. How tragic that that person does not come to terms with a goal of moving forward and upward, but instead settles in for a routine of “dumbing down” themselves. What opportunities that life could offer have then been wasted or not even perceived?

    Pat, it’s good to hear that your “good Ship of Life’s Lessons” is weathering our life of stormy days.

    Greg

    • Greg . . you are an amazing soul. You in-depth perspective resonates with me – we are from the same generation. You made me laugh out loud at your response to “so glad you got that one . . . now work on the other 99! Isn’t that the truth? But. . . there have been more times than not, where my kids have said, “Mom, I completely understand now, what you were trying to tell me, show me, teach me” I guess we live for those moments when the hard facts of life hit us all straight between the eyes and the lessons of old become new and precious. Manner were so very important when I was growing up and my children learned them as well. Now that I’m a “grammy”, I’m always on my grandkids when we are all at the dinner table. I remember learning that we had to ask permission to be excused from the table. Now, everyone just gets up and walks out, dishes still sitting there. AHHHHHH!

      Thanks so much for your perspective and insight. You are gifted!

      Pat

      • Greg Forster

        The dishes, yes! But never, EVER…the cellphone…God forbid we lose our means of non person to person communication! Greg

        • You’re so right, Greg.Interestingly enough, my daughter Kari, passes around a basket when everyones together to eat. In go the cell phones! It’s tough today – kids are taught the value of “face to face” communication. When they reach the real world, their job might insist that they do . . . what then?
          Pat

  • Amy

    Pat,
    You are an inspiration!
    Amy

    • Thank you, Amy
      If someone can take away one small portion, it’s always worth it.

      Pat

  • Sharon

    Pat,

    So many of your remembrances are my remembrances too and reading them took me on a memory journey. It is so true that many of the things we needed to know about life we started to learn in kindergarten and have just expanded upon the rest of our lives.

    I too believe that our families also play into that learning curve to a great extent – especially our parents and grandparents. I didn’t get to see my grandparents very often and so my visits with them are a treasured memory. Their words had a big impact on my young life.

    Thank you for taking time to express your thoughts. They always lift me and cause me to pause and think and remember.

    Sharon

    • Hi Sharon:
      Thank you so much for sharing your memories. When reading the blogs from other team members, no matter what they are talking about, my mind travels back to another day where I reflect and smile, remembering some of those things that they talk about. It’s all about moving through our life and learning those hard life lessons everyday.
      Thank you!
      Pat

  • Shayna Mallik

    Pat,
    You are such an inspirational women. Every blog I read from you I am touched in so many ways. I love reading about your life journeys and hope I can be as inspirational and as strong as you are. Thank you for sharing!!!

    • Hello Shayna
      You’re such a sweet woman. Thank you for taking time to read the blog. Someday, you will have life lessons that you can share with your children and later reflect on as you move through your life. We won’t know how profound they can be until we reach that moment in our lives.
      Thanks so much!

      Pat

  • Jeannie Dorris

    Good thoughts, Pat! Keep it going, please. Now that I know about this blog, I will be reading it regularly. Thanks!

    • Hi Jeannie:
      Thanks so much for taking the time to read my blog, and, because we have been friends for so long, you will remember some of the things that I will be writing about. I know you are a blogger as well, and any input from you would be greatly appreciated.
      Thanks so much.
      Pat

      • Jeannie Dorris

        Hi Pat,
        You are doing such an excellent job with your blog articles, I can’t imagine having any “input” for you. I am so happy to see how you have grown through all that “wrecked havoc” in your life. God has been GOOD to bring you back into an even closer, sweeter walk with Him! Spending time with Him, daily, is the key.
        Your sister in Christ,
        Jeannie

        • Patricia Kolstad

          Jeannie:
          Thank you for your sweet response. It has been a journey, and one that has taken me from the deepest valleys to the mountain tops. Here’s what I have found to be true . . that in the deepest valleys – that’s where all the hard work is done. I have become a better woman and a better mother. I have become a stronger woman, and one that is so very grateful for friends like you and Larry. Thank you again, and I hope to see you back here with me soon.
          Lovingly
          Pat

  • Kris

    Morning, Mom! The thing I love about life lessons is that as life continues, the opportunity to learn is always there. That is so comforting to me on those days when I feel especially beastly! I echo what Kari said: perhaps, upon reflection, you weren’t the mother then that you are today, but it has been a privilege watching your tremendous growth over the years. I can’t say that I agree with the author of the book; that I should have learned all of the basic life lessons in Kinder (I say this with reserve, as I have not read this book.). I think my title would read, “All I Really Need to Know was Taught to Me in Kindergarten, but I was Only 5, So it Didn’t Stick. Thank God I Got out of There!”. Maybe I’m a late bloomer (gads!), but I think most of my deep learning has come with life experiences. The natural self-centeredness of a Kindergartener is a stage that lasted far to long with me, I’m afraid.
    The lessons I hold close that coarse through me daily are ones that I have learned recently! We talked about one over the weekend: everyone comes from somewhere. I have basic needs (emotional, mental) that I want met, but so does everyone else. Eureka! I spend far less time judging others when I remind myself that each person is made uniquely and has been born of a different reality than mine. Being a partner to Jeffrey has taught me that. What a journey he has had!
    I thank God for each day that I am given to spend with my loves. I see in their faces the innumerable lessons I have learned being a part of their lives. Compassion, simplicity, relationships…I could go on and on here about what I’ve learned when I really started to think beyond myself. Time I have with family and dear friends (and my knitting needles, garden, or yoga mat…let’s be honest!) has become so incredibly valuable to me. I am compelled to slooooow down against the hurried pace of this culture, let those learned lessons sink in, and open my heart and mind for new ones. It feels good. Love you, Mom!

    • Jeannie Dorris

      Great “comment”, Kristin!

      • Patricia Kolstad

        She’s my inspiration in so many areas, Jeannie.

        We have wonderful conversations that are so meaningful.. Full of love, experience, joy, fears, sadness, reflection and forgiveness. I so blessed to have my children so close to me!

  • Patricia Kolstad

    My dear Kristen
    Your thoughts are compelling and your perspective on life is something I so agree with. We live such fast paced lives that sometimes we don’t take time to realize that everyone isn’t the same. We need a gentler attitude toward those whose lives have been affected by how they were raised, or more importantly, by whom. I feel very strongly about imparting those things I have learned in the last several years to those I love, with the hope that hard lessons will not be part of their lives. Seek the truth, live your life with a grateful heart and seek guidance before jumping off the cliff! Don’t run with abandon. I love you and I love your heart.
    Momma

  • Pat,
    I just loved reading this post, as well as so many of the O’Connor blog posts be everyone!
    I am enjoying how with each one, including this one, I am reminded to stop, go inwards, and reflect deeply on what matters most in life. I feel so lucky and grateful to be able to get receive these words of wisdom from personal experience in my email in box weekly!

    Pat, I especially enjoyed the fact that you referenced Robert Fulghum’s book which I have not picked up or thought about for some time. Great reminder, lest we forget, to go back to the basics, and this is most crucially important in our more than ever, complex times….

    Thank you again for your courage and from sharing deeply from the heart.
    I look forward to many more essential topics and posts from you and your colleagues!

    Lórien

    • Patricia Kolstad

      Lorien
      It was wonderful meeting you and getting to know you better.

      It’s so important to realize the power of pause. We don’t do it enough. I think that is where we really can ponder the lessons in life that have meant the most to us. The ones that we know are important to our self esteem, our integrity and our character. We all have lots to think about, and sharing our stories is one way we can step back and take a look at where we are and where we still want to be. For me now, it is very purposeful that I remember and relate this things I have learned to my family, my grandchildren, my friends and my colleagues.

      Thank you for your comments. I look forward to seeing you more on the O’Connor Blog page!

      Pat

  • Pat, this post takes me back to some of the wonderful lessons and some of the hard ones I learned as a kid…as well as some of the difficult lessons I’ve learned as an adult.

    The word “humility” comes to mind as I realize the importance of staying humble knowing I’ve made and learned from mistakes that have hurt others in the past. As well, staying open to learning new lessons today and in the future.

    Great post…encouraging words!
    Joey

    • Patricia Kolstad

      Joey:
      What a beautiful word . . humility. It’s obvious to me that we don’t use it often enough . . and for a reason. It often places us in a place we would rather not be.

      As I have aged, I’ve realized what it means to be open to new lessons and depend on the lessons of old – being respectful, learning to communicate well with others, and being trustworthy.

      Thank you so much for sharing on my blog. I look forward to your comments in the future.

      Pat